Justin Spicer

Web Portfolio featuring marketing and business content created by Justin Spicer
"Expand Your Audience with Multi-Level Targeting"
Written for Relevance
———————————————————————-
No matter the content, the goal of marketing is to influence and expand your audience. Depending on the industry, you could be aiming for top recruits, CEOs and COOs, or working to be a thought leader in innovation.
You research and write; then proofread and rewrite. It’s pored over by editors and management until the message is on point. It’s sent via the channels long decided after careful deliberation.
But did it really find its rightful audience?
Sure, the genius software engineer or COO of the fast rising retail chain saw the tweet and read the email newsletter but is that the only viable audience? Shouldn’t your content be reaching more than just a set demographic?
Considering turnover rates continue to rise globally, it’s important to ensure the content you generate is being seen by more than just one concentrated audience. How can you better the reach of your content?
REPURPOSE CONTENT
We’ve touched on this before but it goes deeper than just editing a few paragraphs and changing words to fit a different audience.
If you’ve written a strong white paper intended to reach CEOs, there’s a good chance it should be read by their management and support staff as well. Before you comb a company’s database for email addresses, it’s best to use alternate channels and different messaging to tap this new audience.
Management may care about the steps to achieving a more efficient workplace but their day-to-day activities differ from the CEO. They’re checking Twitter and LinkedIn, perhaps even browsing Facebook—but one thing is for certain, they’re just as active on social media and just as influenced by content as the higher-ups. And they are part of the decision making process, so it’s best to make a connection with them now as they continue to rise up the ranks.
And who knows – maybe your content will be part of the reason they do.
BE CREATIVE
With the rapid growth of new technology and workplace practices, it takes more than just well-written content to make a dent. As you update and change content to fit a new audience, it’s also wise to make sure it’s creative enough to draw them to it in the first place.
A good example is the software engineering industry, which evolves daily as new languages and ideas are created. It’s a competitive industry for fresh perspectives and emerging hotshots. Start-ups and corporate giants need an advantage and where can they find it? In creative marketing content.
A new graduate is unlikely to find a white paper captivating. Though they may carry aspirations of becoming management material, their immediate wants are a desirable salary, ideal location, and a competitive benefits package. Your company may be the best fit but a lengthy list or a few pictures aren’t enough to sell them on your company.
However, there are ideas in the content that are appealing and a means to make them stand out to a new, younger audience. Turn a benefits package into a quick Vine or Instagram video that showcases the fun atmosphere of the office and how those benefits have created it. Transform a lengthy list of best practices into a quirky animation that can be shared across multiple social media platforms. The message doesn’t need changing, just how it’s delivered to meet an undervalued audience.
DON’T HARD SELL
Though the main audience for content is primed for the hard sell, your secondary audience likely isn’t. They may be aspiring leaders or new recruits eager to start their career, but what motivates their decision making isn’t the same as it is for CEOs, COOs, and Boards of Directors.
Putting pressure on them to sell your sundries is a turn off. Putting them in a position to believe that’s their way to get to the top is worse. These are potential allies and future clients, so treat them with respect and guidance. Foster a relationship by making sure repurposed content isn’t dumbed down and is unique in its delivery.
When you put so much time and effort into creating content, it’s almost a waste to target it to just one segment of your audience. The first step is to figure out how to repurpose existing content so that it’s relevant to someone in a different stage of the inbound marketing funnel. Be creative in your efforts to migrate marketing messages from one channel to the next; what works well on one platform might need significant design or creative work to translate into its new format. Finally, when repurposing bottom of the funnel content for a middle or top of the funnel audience, soften the sell to avoid scaring them away.

"Expand Your Audience with Multi-Level Targeting"

Written for Relevance

———————————————————————-

No matter the content, the goal of marketing is to influence and expand your audience. Depending on the industry, you could be aiming for top recruits, CEOs and COOs, or working to be a thought leader in innovation.

You research and write; then proofread and rewrite. It’s pored over by editors and management until the message is on point. It’s sent via the channels long decided after careful deliberation.

But did it really find its rightful audience?

Sure, the genius software engineer or COO of the fast rising retail chain saw the tweet and read the email newsletter but is that the only viable audience? Shouldn’t your content be reaching more than just a set demographic?

Considering turnover rates continue to rise globally, it’s important to ensure the content you generate is being seen by more than just one concentrated audience. How can you better the reach of your content?

REPURPOSE CONTENT

We’ve touched on this before but it goes deeper than just editing a few paragraphs and changing words to fit a different audience.

If you’ve written a strong white paper intended to reach CEOs, there’s a good chance it should be read by their management and support staff as well. Before you comb a company’s database for email addresses, it’s best to use alternate channels and different messaging to tap this new audience.

Management may care about the steps to achieving a more efficient workplace but their day-to-day activities differ from the CEO. They’re checking Twitter and LinkedIn, perhaps even browsing Facebook—but one thing is for certain, they’re just as active on social media and just as influenced by content as the higher-ups. And they are part of the decision making process, so it’s best to make a connection with them now as they continue to rise up the ranks.

And who knows – maybe your content will be part of the reason they do.

BE CREATIVE

With the rapid growth of new technology and workplace practices, it takes more than just well-written content to make a dent. As you update and change content to fit a new audience, it’s also wise to make sure it’s creative enough to draw them to it in the first place.

A good example is the software engineering industry, which evolves daily as new languages and ideas are created. It’s a competitive industry for fresh perspectives and emerging hotshots. Start-ups and corporate giants need an advantage and where can they find it? In creative marketing content.

A new graduate is unlikely to find a white paper captivating. Though they may carry aspirations of becoming management material, their immediate wants are a desirable salary, ideal location, and a competitive benefits package. Your company may be the best fit but a lengthy list or a few pictures aren’t enough to sell them on your company.

However, there are ideas in the content that are appealing and a means to make them stand out to a new, younger audience. Turn a benefits package into a quick Vine or Instagram video that showcases the fun atmosphere of the office and how those benefits have created it. Transform a lengthy list of best practices into a quirky animation that can be shared across multiple social media platforms. The message doesn’t need changing, just how it’s delivered to meet an undervalued audience.

DON’T HARD SELL

Though the main audience for content is primed for the hard sell, your secondary audience likely isn’t. They may be aspiring leaders or new recruits eager to start their career, but what motivates their decision making isn’t the same as it is for CEOs, COOs, and Boards of Directors.

Putting pressure on them to sell your sundries is a turn off. Putting them in a position to believe that’s their way to get to the top is worse. These are potential allies and future clients, so treat them with respect and guidance. Foster a relationship by making sure repurposed content isn’t dumbed down and is unique in its delivery.

When you put so much time and effort into creating content, it’s almost a waste to target it to just one segment of your audience. The first step is to figure out how to repurpose existing content so that it’s relevant to someone in a different stage of the inbound marketing funnel. Be creative in your efforts to migrate marketing messages from one channel to the next; what works well on one platform might need significant design or creative work to translate into its new format. Finally, when repurposing bottom of the funnel content for a middle or top of the funnel audience, soften the sell to avoid scaring them away.

"Why Hobbyists Make Great Content Providers"
Written for Relevance
————————————————
After surviving my first brush with Gen Con, I was amazed to witness how tens of thousands of people had turned a hobby into a passion. Within that subset, there were those who turned a passion into an entrepreneurial spirit. And if you care to delve further, there is a group who has turned their ideas into moneymaking companies that fuel the dreams of people new to the experience.
Having hobbies, it turns out, isn’t just about escaping the work week. Studies show hobbies can boast productivity and creativity at work. Encouraging hobbies to occur in the workplace also has its benefits, so maybe you should start a fantasy football league and build company comradery.
But the benefits to productivity and team building are just the beginning.
RESEARCH
Returning to the fantasy football example, many participants will spend hours poring over stats, injury reports, and film to make sure they draft wisely in preparation for the upcoming season. Anyone who spends countless time examining web traffic, SEO trends, and reliable keywords can tell you an attention to detail and the ability to comb through a lot of statistical noise to find the integral and usable information is a valuable resource. Not only does it save time and energy for a company in the long run, it allows content creators to focus on the right messages through the best channels.
So yes, your content writer’s understanding of statistical trends of running backs over the age of 28 can have a positive effect on the marketing content they are writing. Being a thorough researcher is an acquired skill and those hours spent navigating countless web resources to read the latest about music equipment or the best biking trails will pay off.
ENGAGEMENT
Many of us have had experience with discussion forums and it’s been established that six percent of internet users are on Reddit. Though you’ve likely encountered your fair share of trolls and naysayers, most message boards encourage open, but friendly, debate. Users learn to engage other users in chat, relationships are formed, and common courtesy usually wins the day.
Those skills translate to how content is created and translated to the target audience. Understanding how to appeal to someone on a message board with a formed opinion helps to keep marketing content focused on the audience at hand.
It’s likely you’re writing for an audience that has its mind made up, so rather than use a combative or negative tone in an effort to change it, it’s better to go positive and use quantifiable and vetted information (such as your most prized earned media) to talk about your brand. Argumentative or defensive content is off-putting, but cooperative and open-minded content showcases your business in its best light.
KNOWLEDGE
Knowledge is the best benefit fostered by encouraging hobby and work crossover. Jeb Banner has covered the benefits of hiring musicians, and it’s an idea whose time has come.
Hobbies encourage people to seek the most up to date information to make critical decisions. The same is true in regards to content. It’s likely your company has access to its own experts, and it is up to content creators to tap into such resources and use them.
Likewise, content creators are often a wealth of data themselves and should be encouraged to share what they know. What is at first just participation eventually grows into expertise. Many content marketers have hobbies which involving writing and editing, and though the audience for one may not cross over to another, the rules often do.
Just as Banner and others look for musicians, some of the best content writers are hobby journalists who must adhere to guidelines that make the most of SEO and keyword optimization. They dig deep to ensure articles generate buzz and it’s the same knowledge that can be brought to a marketing project.
Hobbies teach us how to better ourselves through learning. The same logic applies to content creation. Understanding how to find the best resources, navigate those resources, engage with others, and put it all into use is vital to designing content that best represents your company’s public image. Though hobbies may be an escape, they also provide the opportunity to learn new skills and to apply them on the job.
How are you using your hobbies to better your work?

"Why Hobbyists Make Great Content Providers"

Written for Relevance

————————————————

After surviving my first brush with Gen Con, I was amazed to witness how tens of thousands of people had turned a hobby into a passion. Within that subset, there were those who turned a passion into an entrepreneurial spirit. And if you care to delve further, there is a group who has turned their ideas into moneymaking companies that fuel the dreams of people new to the experience.

Having hobbies, it turns out, isn’t just about escaping the work week. Studies show hobbies can boast productivity and creativity at work. Encouraging hobbies to occur in the workplace also has its benefits, so maybe you should start a fantasy football league and build company comradery.

But the benefits to productivity and team building are just the beginning.

RESEARCH

Returning to the fantasy football example, many participants will spend hours poring over stats, injury reports, and film to make sure they draft wisely in preparation for the upcoming season. Anyone who spends countless time examining web traffic, SEO trends, and reliable keywords can tell you an attention to detail and the ability to comb through a lot of statistical noise to find the integral and usable information is a valuable resource. Not only does it save time and energy for a company in the long run, it allows content creators to focus on the right messages through the best channels.

So yes, your content writer’s understanding of statistical trends of running backs over the age of 28 can have a positive effect on the marketing content they are writing. Being a thorough researcher is an acquired skill and those hours spent navigating countless web resources to read the latest about music equipment or the best biking trails will pay off.

ENGAGEMENT

Many of us have had experience with discussion forums and it’s been established that six percent of internet users are on Reddit. Though you’ve likely encountered your fair share of trolls and naysayers, most message boards encourage open, but friendly, debate. Users learn to engage other users in chat, relationships are formed, and common courtesy usually wins the day.

Those skills translate to how content is created and translated to the target audience. Understanding how to appeal to someone on a message board with a formed opinion helps to keep marketing content focused on the audience at hand.

It’s likely you’re writing for an audience that has its mind made up, so rather than use a combative or negative tone in an effort to change it, it’s better to go positive and use quantifiable and vetted information (such as your most prized earned media) to talk about your brand. Argumentative or defensive content is off-putting, but cooperative and open-minded content showcases your business in its best light.

KNOWLEDGE

Knowledge is the best benefit fostered by encouraging hobby and work crossover. Jeb Banner has covered the benefits of hiring musicians, and it’s an idea whose time has come.

Hobbies encourage people to seek the most up to date information to make critical decisions. The same is true in regards to content. It’s likely your company has access to its own experts, and it is up to content creators to tap into such resources and use them.

Likewise, content creators are often a wealth of data themselves and should be encouraged to share what they know. What is at first just participation eventually grows into expertise. Many content marketers have hobbies which involving writing and editing, and though the audience for one may not cross over to another, the rules often do.

Just as Banner and others look for musicians, some of the best content writers are hobby journalists who must adhere to guidelines that make the most of SEO and keyword optimization. They dig deep to ensure articles generate buzz and it’s the same knowledge that can be brought to a marketing project.

Hobbies teach us how to better ourselves through learning. The same logic applies to content creation. Understanding how to find the best resources, navigate those resources, engage with others, and put it all into use is vital to designing content that best represents your company’s public image. Though hobbies may be an escape, they also provide the opportunity to learn new skills and to apply them on the job.

How are you using your hobbies to better your work?

"Content Marketing Lessons from the Entertainment Industry"
Written for Relevance
———————————————————————
The entertainment industry’s constant struggle for continued success has become a steady source of news. It is embedded in many of our daily habits, even if it’s just a quick glance at the cable guide to see what is on after a long day.
Yet there is much to learn from the nonstop coverage of the Kardashians and the rise and fall of television shows that hit the bottom as quickly as they achieve mass acclaim. The entertainment industry is ever-evolving, quickly assimilating to emerging tastes and opinions from the audiences they seek to win over. It’s an epidemic that has swelled as access to information has sped up in this technological boon.
The truth is that the roller coaster of achievements and failures that plague the entertainment industry are those that also haunt the content marketing world. Fads come and go in the blink of an eye. The latest trend in branding can become hackneyed over the course of a text message conversation between teenagers, and that toy your child coveted 15 minutes ago is obsolete by the time you’re ready to help them purchase it.
So how do entertainment companies survive, and how can these tactics help you improve your marketing content?
ESTABLISH BRAND REPUTATION
This seems like the easiest takeaway because it’s the pursuit of any company, agency, or marketer. Though we all want to be Apple or Google, their branding connects to their willingness to take chances on creative campaigns (and their ability to handle flops when those chances taken don’t pan out).
Marketing on a smaller scale does not allow for successive failures—or any perceived failures, for that matter. So how do you establish and cultivate a brand reputation? It begins by identifying your audience.
For example, Disney understands the customer base for Marvel products. They started small by casting Robert Downey Jr. in the titular Iron Man role. Downey Jr. had a reputation for being a superb actor, but also for many personal failings. Iron Man was a popular niche comic book character that mirrored Downey’s foibles. It was a risk, but one that fell in line with the branding Marvel sought to attach to their name.
It’s a similar formula in music. Though major labels seek to sing myriad artists across numerous musical genres, smaller independent labels often curate a sound and image to attract a particular audience share that may be neglected by larger conglomerates.
Founded in 1986, Sub Pop Records existed as a means to explore the evolving music scene in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. As much of it exploded into grunge and alternative music in the early part of the decade, Sub Pop was at the forefront of that success thanks to early investments in bands such as Nirvana and Soundgarden.
In other words, they understood the value of their own community and the branding associated with connecting and fostering it.
RECYCLE CONTENT
The entertainment industry is often accused of lacking original ideas, but it’s hard to argue against the popularity of sequels and reboots. Ours is a world filled with a handful of Supermans, Batmans, and a spree ofcheaply made, and yet high grossing, horror films.
The world of young adult novels finds countless hits in trilogies obsessed with teenagers fighting against a dystopic future where adults have taken away decisions and resources, squashing freedom of choice in favor of myopic control. The Harry Potter series has spawned countless copycats and websites filled with devout fan fiction. When an audience finds a world or subject matter that it enjoys, it wants to live in it as long as possible.
The same is true with the pile of case studies, white papers, and social media content you accumulate. A few edits and you can reboot your case study into a white paper, transform a tweet into a new blog post topic, or whittle down a white paper into bullet points readymade for LinkedIn or Facebook. Good content isn’t meant for a single use. It should be repurposed, improved, and rebooted to engage different audiences.
USE SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DIFFERENTLY
Speaking of varied engagement, understanding how to use a wide array of social media channels has amounted to stars being made on a daily basis. No longer does it take a reality show or dedication to stage and screen to birth a new celebrity.
Entrepreneur Dan Bilzerian has made a name for himself not as a high stakes poker player and venture capitalist, but as someone who has an engaging (and risqué) Instagram account. Kim Kardashian has used mobile gaming to boost an already ample profile by putting her image within an app so popular that even theEPA is apparently playing.
Understanding the audience of social media is important to establishing your brand and making use of generated content. If you’re a company actively courting a young female demographic, set up a profile on Pinterest. If you’re trying to lure recruits to work at your firm, you should be connecting with them on LinkedIn and following them on Twitter. If you’re a goods-and-services business, try using Snapchat to lure customers into trying out your latest product.
CONTENT IS VISUAL AS WELL AS WRITTEN
As important as robust dialogue and complex characters are to entertainment, it’s equally valuable to understand that content generation isn’t just perfectly edited words and ideas but how they are presented. Though some films can find moderate success in spite of massive plot holes and terrible acting or bad direction, it’s imperative to match up the written message with the right visual setting.
The best movies and television shows make sure we’re a part of the time and era. “Mad Men” makes sure to write snappy dialogue that can speak to a modern audience, and yet its set props and main plot points are ensconced in the 1960s to ensure a unified message. Music and literature also rely on visual cues to connect the message with the setting. Album art often sets the mood and illustrations or descriptive prose is integral to proper storytelling in print.
It’s no secret that blog posts with images are read and shared more often than those without accompanying visuals; make sure you employ that common knowledge on all of your channels (where it’s appropriate) and spend as much time developing beautiful graphics as you do on writing the copy to go with them.
NEVER FADE AWAY
With so many entertainment options and channels, it’s not uncommon to find the hottest young stars struggling to find work after their initial success. The world is full of Topher Graces and Harper Lees who reach great heights only to succumb to the new flavors of the month.
Audiences are fickle and the moment a celebrity takes a step out of the spotlight, they soon find that it isn’t so easy to step back in and renew that hard won success, which is why it is necessary to pick the best social media outlets for your content and keep them updated.
Content production may never go out of style, but any lull in its publication can mean losing the audience you worked so hard to cultivate. You must work just as hard to keep your brand in the public eye as you did in establishing the social media base in the first place.
Content may be king, but how you use it is crucial to its appeal. How is your content influenced by the entertainment industry and what cues can you take from it?

"Content Marketing Lessons from the Entertainment Industry"

Written for Relevance

———————————————————————

The entertainment industry’s constant struggle for continued success has become a steady source of news. It is embedded in many of our daily habits, even if it’s just a quick glance at the cable guide to see what is on after a long day.

Yet there is much to learn from the nonstop coverage of the Kardashians and the rise and fall of television shows that hit the bottom as quickly as they achieve mass acclaim. The entertainment industry is ever-evolving, quickly assimilating to emerging tastes and opinions from the audiences they seek to win over. It’s an epidemic that has swelled as access to information has sped up in this technological boon.

The truth is that the roller coaster of achievements and failures that plague the entertainment industry are those that also haunt the content marketing world. Fads come and go in the blink of an eye. The latest trend in branding can become hackneyed over the course of a text message conversation between teenagers, and that toy your child coveted 15 minutes ago is obsolete by the time you’re ready to help them purchase it.

So how do entertainment companies survive, and how can these tactics help you improve your marketing content?

ESTABLISH BRAND REPUTATION

This seems like the easiest takeaway because it’s the pursuit of any company, agency, or marketer. Though we all want to be Apple or Google, their branding connects to their willingness to take chances on creative campaigns (and their ability to handle flops when those chances taken don’t pan out).

Marketing on a smaller scale does not allow for successive failures—or any perceived failures, for that matter. So how do you establish and cultivate a brand reputation? It begins by identifying your audience.

For example, Disney understands the customer base for Marvel products. They started small by casting Robert Downey Jr. in the titular Iron Man role. Downey Jr. had a reputation for being a superb actor, but also for many personal failings. Iron Man was a popular niche comic book character that mirrored Downey’s foibles. It was a risk, but one that fell in line with the branding Marvel sought to attach to their name.

It’s a similar formula in music. Though major labels seek to sing myriad artists across numerous musical genres, smaller independent labels often curate a sound and image to attract a particular audience share that may be neglected by larger conglomerates.

Founded in 1986, Sub Pop Records existed as a means to explore the evolving music scene in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. As much of it exploded into grunge and alternative music in the early part of the decade, Sub Pop was at the forefront of that success thanks to early investments in bands such as Nirvana and Soundgarden.

In other words, they understood the value of their own community and the branding associated with connecting and fostering it.

RECYCLE CONTENT

The entertainment industry is often accused of lacking original ideas, but it’s hard to argue against the popularity of sequels and reboots. Ours is a world filled with a handful of Supermans, Batmans, and a spree ofcheaply made, and yet high grossing, horror films.

The world of young adult novels finds countless hits in trilogies obsessed with teenagers fighting against a dystopic future where adults have taken away decisions and resources, squashing freedom of choice in favor of myopic control. The Harry Potter series has spawned countless copycats and websites filled with devout fan fiction. When an audience finds a world or subject matter that it enjoys, it wants to live in it as long as possible.

The same is true with the pile of case studies, white papers, and social media content you accumulate. A few edits and you can reboot your case study into a white paper, transform a tweet into a new blog post topic, or whittle down a white paper into bullet points readymade for LinkedIn or Facebook. Good content isn’t meant for a single use. It should be repurposed, improved, and rebooted to engage different audiences.

USE SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DIFFERENTLY

Speaking of varied engagement, understanding how to use a wide array of social media channels has amounted to stars being made on a daily basis. No longer does it take a reality show or dedication to stage and screen to birth a new celebrity.

Entrepreneur Dan Bilzerian has made a name for himself not as a high stakes poker player and venture capitalist, but as someone who has an engaging (and risqué) Instagram account. Kim Kardashian has used mobile gaming to boost an already ample profile by putting her image within an app so popular that even theEPA is apparently playing.

Understanding the audience of social media is important to establishing your brand and making use of generated content. If you’re a company actively courting a young female demographic, set up a profile on Pinterest. If you’re trying to lure recruits to work at your firm, you should be connecting with them on LinkedIn and following them on Twitter. If you’re a goods-and-services business, try using Snapchat to lure customers into trying out your latest product.

CONTENT IS VISUAL AS WELL AS WRITTEN

As important as robust dialogue and complex characters are to entertainment, it’s equally valuable to understand that content generation isn’t just perfectly edited words and ideas but how they are presented. Though some films can find moderate success in spite of massive plot holes and terrible acting or bad direction, it’s imperative to match up the written message with the right visual setting.

The best movies and television shows make sure we’re a part of the time and era. “Mad Men” makes sure to write snappy dialogue that can speak to a modern audience, and yet its set props and main plot points are ensconced in the 1960s to ensure a unified message. Music and literature also rely on visual cues to connect the message with the setting. Album art often sets the mood and illustrations or descriptive prose is integral to proper storytelling in print.

It’s no secret that blog posts with images are read and shared more often than those without accompanying visuals; make sure you employ that common knowledge on all of your channels (where it’s appropriate) and spend as much time developing beautiful graphics as you do on writing the copy to go with them.

NEVER FADE AWAY

With so many entertainment options and channels, it’s not uncommon to find the hottest young stars struggling to find work after their initial success. The world is full of Topher Graces and Harper Lees who reach great heights only to succumb to the new flavors of the month.

Audiences are fickle and the moment a celebrity takes a step out of the spotlight, they soon find that it isn’t so easy to step back in and renew that hard won success, which is why it is necessary to pick the best social media outlets for your content and keep them updated.

Content production may never go out of style, but any lull in its publication can mean losing the audience you worked so hard to cultivate. You must work just as hard to keep your brand in the public eye as you did in establishing the social media base in the first place.

Content may be king, but how you use it is crucial to its appeal. How is your content influenced by the entertainment industry and what cues can you take from it?

meHive website
Wrote and edited website content for meHive, a free relationship management tool for iPad.

meHive website

Wrote and edited website content for meHive, a free relationship management tool for iPad.

meHive — iPad application

Wrote iTunes description, generated keywords, and constructed content in-app for the meHive relationship management tool

Press Release for the band, Eternal Summers, as commissioned by Kanine Records. 

Press Release for the band, Eternal Summers, as commissioned by Kanine Records. 

(Source: kaninerecords.com)

Press Release for the band SAPPHIC as commissioned by record label, Warm Ratio

Press Release for the band SAPPHIC as commissioned by record label, Warm Ratio

Press Release for band, Bleeding Rainbow, as commissioned by record label, Kanine. 

Press Release for band, Bleeding Rainbow, as commissioned by record label, Kanine. 

(Source: kaninerecords.com)

SEP Website Redesign 
Wrote all the content, provided pictures, and pitched ideas on redesign of SEP’s new website. 

SEP Website Redesign 

Wrote all the content, provided pictures, and pitched ideas on redesign of SEP’s new website. 

SEP Blog
Curator, Editor, and monitor of SEP Blog. Generates topics and ideas, allowing SEP staff the freedom to create fun content that is geared toward potential and longtime clients, recruits, and technical readers. 

SEP Blog

Curator, Editor, and monitor of SEP Blog. Generates topics and ideas, allowing SEP staff the freedom to create fun content that is geared toward potential and longtime clients, recruits, and technical readers.